Thursday Thoughts 32.0: January Recap

Happy Thursday everyone! Can you believe we are already at the end of another month? Neither can I! I liked doing these monthly recap posts last year, and I think I will keep doing them this year. So, here is my January in review:

***

[1]

January was a good month in reading for me–I read six books!

Books read:

1.  Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

2.  Sisterland by Curtis Sittenfeld

3.  The Call of the Wild by Jack London

4. The Club Dumas by Arturo Perez-Reverte

5. White Fang by Jack London

6. The Pact by Jodi Picoult

Books Reviewed:

1. The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith/J.K. Rowling

2. The Smartest Guys in the Room: The Amazing Rise and Scandalous Fall of Enron by Bethany McLean and Peter Elkind

3. Frozen in Time by Mitchell Zuckoff

[2]

At the end of last year when it became clear I was not going to make the 1000 mile cardio goal I had set for myself, I decided to try again in 2014. So how am I doing so far?

January

….Not that great apparently. In my defense it was really (really) cold in January, and because of that I worked from home a lot (and thus had less access to the gym). I also caught a cold in the middle of the month…excuses, excuses I know. On the bright side, 41 miles is not the lowest number I’ve recorded in a month or even the second lowest (o.k. by one mile…but WHO’S COUNTING!?!?!) so that’s something! January is a little early to throw in the towel, but I will have to step it up the next few months.

In other fitness related news, I also set myself a goal of completing three strength/resistance training sessions a week this year. I decided to implement this change to my fitness regime because I kept reading all these articles about how muscle burns more calories than fat and speeds up your metabolism, plus I know I’m pretty weak. I’m happy to report that so far this goal is going really well. Although I have yet to actually fit in three strength sessions in a week, I haven’t yet missed a week. I’m also stepping out of my comfort zone and participating in group exercise classes at my gym (just core fitness and the like…I’m still scared of body pump). Thus far, I’m enjoying this addition to my workouts!

[3]

January Nail Art:

January

Base/Top Coat: Sally Hansen Flawless

Nail polish: Sally Hansen Midnight in NY, Essie Good as Gold, Essie Silver Bullions

January2WaterMark

Base/Top Coat: Sally Hansen Flawless

Nail polish: CoverGirl Outlast Vio-Last

Accent Nail: Sally Hansen Hi Ho Silver

[4]

Recipes Posted:

Healthier Chicken Piccata

Cinnamon Apple Muffins

Peanut Butter Cookies

[5]

Fun things I did in January:

1) Finally met my sister’s BFF Tanya

1485114_10151900076304091_1002357553_n

2) Played a game Battlestar Galactica (in which the humans lost very badly)

IMG_1185

3) Endured The Polar Vortex/General Cold (o.k. this one wasn’t fun, but was noteworthy)

1531878_10100357207989131_1130622919_n

Photo Credit: Dana

4) Fun night with friends at Schubas

schlitzwatermark

I didn’t even know they served Schlitz on tap, let alone in these fancy flutes…

***

Hope you had a good week and have a great weekend!

Advertisements

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 18.0

Happy Monday everyone! I hope you are staying warm wherever you are. I’m wearing two layers of clothing today…but trust me it was necessary! This week I am participating in the “It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?” meme.

***

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

My thoughts on books I recently finished:

frozen in time

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

On November 5, 1942, a U.S. cargo plane on a routine flight slammed into the Greenland ice cap. Four days later, a B-17 on the search-and-rescue mission became lost in a blinding storm and also crashed. Miraculously, all nine men on the B-17 survived. The U.S. military launched a second daring rescue operation, but the Grumman Duck amphibious plane sent to find the men flew into a severe storm and vanished.

In this thrilling adventure, Mitchell Zuckoff offers a spellbinding account of these harrowing disasters and the fate of the survivors and their would-be saviors. Frozen in Time places us at the center of a group of valiant airmen fighting to stay alive through 148 days of a brutal Arctic winter by sheltering from subzero temperatures and vicious blizzards in the tail section of the broken B-17 until an expedition headed by famed Arctic explorer Bernt Balchen attempts to bring them to safety.

But that is only part of the story that unfolds in Frozen in Time. In present-day Greenland, Zuckoff joins the U.S. Coast Guard and North South Polar—a company led by the indefatigable dreamer Lou Sapienza, who worked for years to solve the mystery of the Duck’s last flight—on a dangerous expedition to recover the remains of the lost plane’s crew.

Drawing on intensive research and Zuckoff ’s firsthand account of the dramatic 2012 expedition, Frozen in Time is a breathtaking blend of mystery, adventure, heroism, and survival. It is also a poignant reminder of the sacrifices of our military personnel and their families—and a tribute to the important, perilous, and often-overlooked work of the U.S. Coast Guard.

They say bad things come in three’s, and for the U.S. Military’s operations in Greenland in November of 1942 this was definitely the case, as recounted by Michell Zuckoff in Frozen in Time. This non-fiction tome reads like an thriller/adventure novel, and alternates between the original crashes of 1942 and the present day attempt to rescue the Grumman Duck from its ice-encrusted tomb.

I really enjoyed reading this harrowing survival story, and was on the edge of my seat while waiting to figure out if any of the men would ever make it off the ice. It was amazing to me that the men could survive at all under those extreme conditions (let alone without ever having had any cold weather survival training), and that they could do it with such selflessness, integrity, and humanity. I was also touched and moved by the attempts of others to save the men and keep them alive, often at great risk to their own safety. Zuckoff’s re-telling of these events is by far the strongest and best part of the book. Side note: it was also interesting to learn things about Greenland and the arctic. For instance, did you know Greenland was part of the Kingdom of Denmark or that it is (very not densely) inhabited?

The present day sections were interesting but dragged at times (one reviewer noted they “read like a long National Geographic article”). Also, since Zuckoff had a significant financial stake in the operation to retrieve the Grumman Duck, these sections felt a bit more forced somehow. The present day story was definitely worth reading, but just couldn’t quite compare to the survival story on the ice. I found myself hurrying through so I could get back to the 1942 sections of the book.

Overall, I really enjoyed this story. Although at times it was a bit sad, it was inspiring and very moving. 4/5 stars.

Books I recently read:

sisterland

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

From an early age, Kate and her identical twin sister, Violet, knew that they were unlike everyone else. Kate and Vi were born with peculiar “senses”—innate psychic abilities concerning future events and other people’s secrets. Though Vi embraced her visions, Kate did her best to hide them.

Now, years later, their different paths have led them both back to their hometown of St. Louis. Vi has pursued an eccentric career as a psychic medium, while Kate, a devoted wife and mother, has settled down in the suburbs to raise her two young children. But when a minor earthquake hits in the middle of the night, the normal life Kate has always wished for begins to shift. After Vi goes on television to share a premonition that another, more devastating earthquake will soon hit the St. Louis area, Kate is mortified. Equally troubling, however, is her fear that Vi may be right. As the date of the predicted earthquake quickly approaches, Kate is forced to reconcile her fraught relationship with her sister and to face truths about herself she’s long tried to deny.

call of the wild

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

First published in 1903, The Call of the Wild is regarded as Jack London’s masterpiece. Based on London’s experiences as a gold prospector in the Canadian wilderness and his ideas about nature and the struggle for existence, The Call of the Wild is a tale about unbreakable spirit and the fight for survival in the frozen Alaskan Klondike.

Club Dumas

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

A well-know bibliophile is found hanged days after selling a rare manuscript of Alexander Dumas’s classic, The Three Musketeers. Across Madrid, Spain’s wealthiest book dealer has finally laid his hands on a 17th-century manual for summoning the devil. Lucas Corso, solitary and obsessive, is the detective hired to authenticate both texts. But the further he follows the trail of devil worship, the more it leads him back to Dumas. He’s the unwitting protagonist in someone’s evil plot, but is he sleuth or hero, Sherlock Holmes or d’Artagnan?

White-Fang

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

Jack London’s adventure masterpiece is not only a vivid account of the Klondike gold rush and North American Indian life, but it is also an intriguing study of the effects different environments have on an individual. Celebrate the centennial anniversary of the classic tale of a wolf-dog who endures great cruelty before he comes to know human kindness.

This Week I am reading:

The_Pact

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

For eighteen years the Hartes and the Golds have lived next door to each other, sharing everything from Chinese food to chicken pox to carpool duty– they’ve grown so close it seems they have always been a part of each other’s lives. Parents and children alike have been best friends, so it’s no surprise that in high school Chris and Emily’s friendship blossoms into something more. They’ve been soul mates since they were born.

So when midnight calls from the hospital come in, no one is ready for the appalling truth: Emily is dead at seventeen from a gunshot wound to the head. There’s a single unspent bullet in the gun that Chris took from his father’s cabinet– a bullet that Chris tells police he intended for himself. But a local detective has doubts about the suicide pact that Chris has described.

This Week I am listening to:

Maya'sNotebook

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

Isabel Allende’s latest novel, set in the present day (a new departure for the author), tells the story of a 19-year-old American girl who finds refuge on a remote island off the coast of Chile after falling into a life of drugs, crime, and prostitution. There, in the company of a torture survivor, a lame dog, and other unforgettable characters, Maya Vidal writes her story, which includes pursuit by a gang of assassins, the police, the FBI, and Interpol. In the process, she unveils a terrible family secret, comes to understand the meaning of love and loyalty, and initiates the greatest adventure of her life: the journey into her own soul.

***

What are you reading this week?

It's Monday

Linking up with Book Journey!

Peanut Butter Cookies

Happy Thursday everyone! Today I’m sharing a recipe for Peanut Butter Cookies. I made these a long time ago and really liked them! These are unique in that they have white chocolate chips in them in addition to the peanut butter chips, which I think makes them extra delicious. After writing this post, I’m totally craving them and am going to have to whip up another batch soon!

***

Peanut Butter Cookies

Adapted from: Stylish Cuisine

PeanutButterCookiesWatermarked

Ingredients:

1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour 

3/4 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened

1 cup peanut butter

3/4 cup sugar plus 1 tablespoon for sprinkling

1/2 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

1 large egg

1 tablespoon milk

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/2 cup peanut butter chips

1/2 cup white chocolate chips

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a medium/large bowl, combine the flour, the baking soda, the baking powder, and the salt.  Set aside.

In a large(er) bowl, beat the butter and the peanut butter together until fluffy. Then, add the sugars and beat until smooth. Next, add the egg and mix well. Last, add the milk and the vanilla extract.

To the butter and peanut butter mixture, add the flour mixture and beat thoroughly. Stir in the peanut butter and chocolate chips.

Place sprinkling sugar on a separate plate. Drop dough by rounded teaspoonfuls into the sugar, then onto ungreased cookie sheets. Be sure to leave several inches between for expansion. Finally, using a fork, lightly indent with a criss-cross pattern, but do not overly flatten cookies.

Bake for 10 to 12 minutes. Do not over bake.

Cool the cookies on the sheets for 1 minute, then remove to a rack to cool completely.

Notes:

This recipe yields about 3 dozen cookies.

Cinnamon Apple Muffins

Happy Friday everyone! Today I am sharing my favorite muffin recipe. Admittedly, these are a bit labor intensive, but trust me they are WORTH IT. This is a great recipe–I’ve made it several times!

***

Cinnamon Apple Muffins

Adapted from: Add a Pinch

applecinnamonmuffins

Ingredients:

For the Muffin:

2 cups all-purpose flour (plus 2 teaspoons for coating apples)

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons ground cinnamon (plus 1/2 teaspoon for coating apples)

2 cups diced apples

1/2 cup butter, room temperature

1 cup granulated sugar

2 large eggs

2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

1/2 cup milk

For the Topping:

1/2 cup butter, melted

1/4 cup granulated sugar (original recipe calls for 1/2 cup)

1/4 cup ground cinnamon (original recipe calls for 1/2 cup)

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 375º F. If you are not using paper cupcake liners, be sure to grease the muffin tins.

Sift together flour, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon in a medium bowl. Set aside.

Toss together diced apples and 2 teaspoons of flour to coat apples in a separate bowl. Set aside.

In a large bowl, cream together butter and sugar until lightened in color. Add an egg, one at a time, taking care to fully incorporate before adding the other. Mix in vanilla.

Gently fold in flour mixture, alternating with milk. Stir until just combined. Then, fold in diced apples.

Next, scoop mixture into prepared muffin tins, filling about 2/3 to 3/4 full. Bake until a toothpick or skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean, about 30 minutes (my oven runs hot, so I only bake about 23 minutes).

While the muffins are baking, prepare the topping for the muffins. First, melt the butter in a bowl that can easily accommodate the top of a muffin (for dipping) and allow it to cool slightly. In a separate bowl, mix together granulated sugar and cinnamon in a separate bowl and set aside.

Once muffins have baked, remove from the oven and allow to cool slightly in the muffin tin. Then, remove each muffin and dip first into the melted butter and then into the cinnamon sugar mixture. Place onto a plate to finish cooling.

Notes:

Since this recipe makes enough muffins to last for days, I usually reheat them in the microwave for about 15 seconds (on 70% power) to recreate that “fresh from the oven” deliciousness.

Thursday Thoughts 31.0

Happy 2014 everyone! I’m so excited to be getting in a Thursday Thoughts post on a Thursday without it being a monthly recap post. Now if only I can actually stick to this schedule every week in 2014…Ha! It probably won’t happen but a girl can always dream right? 😉

***

[1]

Can I take a minute of your time and talk about how awful the weather has been? I’m sure you are sick of hearing about it, but I wanted to share some images my friend Dana took (since she is way braver than me) of Chicago-land (i.e. “Chiberia”) during the so-called “polar vortex.”  They do an excellent job of showcasing the extremely harsh, but strangely beautiful conditions we have been dealing with:

1531878_10100357207989131_1130622919_n

Photo Credit: Dana

1545893_10100357208473161_386775414_n

Photo Credit: Dana

The past week has been without a doubt the coldest weather I have experienced in my life, and I wouldn’t mind at all if I never did again. The good news is we might hit near 40 F this weekend–it’ll practically feel like summer weather!

[2]

After having a wonderful and relaxing break over the holidays, I’ve been trying to get back in the swing of things at work. I have set some ambitious goals for myself this year, namely getting a manuscript completed soon, and I’m trying to stick to my daily “to-do” list to get things done. Hopefully I can keep at it, and 2014 will be a productive year for me.

[3]

New Years Nail Art:

January

Base/Top Coat: Sally Hansen Flawless

Nail polish: Sally Hansen Midnight in NY, Essie Good as Gold, Essie Silver Bullions

[4]

Last weekend, before the terrible cold moved in, I finally got to meet my sister’s BFF Tanya

1485114_10151900076304091_1002357553_n

I had heard so much about her, and it was awesome to finally meet her. We had a great time talking and ate delicious guacamole and tacos at Mercadito.

[5]

On Sunday we played our first game of Battlestar Galactica. It was a very (very) unlucky game for the humans (of which I was one).

IMG_1185

So many cylon ships attacking us!!!!

Needless to say, we (the humans) didn’t win but I still had a great time.

***

Hope the new year is treating you right!

Healthier Chicken Piccata

Happy Tuesday everyone! Hope you are staying warm wherever today finds you!

***

Healthier Chicken Piccata

Adapted from: Good Housekeeping

Chicken Piccata

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 large eggs

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

1 pound thin-sliced chicken cutlets

2 tablespoons butter

1/2 teaspoon finely chopped garlic

1 cup chicken broth

1/4 cup capers, rinsed and drained

2 tablespoons white wine vinegar

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Instructions:

In 12-inch heat skillet, heat olive oil on medium.

Next, in shallow bowl, beat eggs. Sprinkle flour onto large plate. Dredge chicken in eggs, then in flour.

Then, add 1 tablespoon butter to olive oil in skillet. When butter melts, add chicken in batches if necessary. Cook chicken 6 to 8 minutes or until browned, turned over at least once. Transfer to platter and set aside.

To drippings in skillet, add garlic and remaining 1 tablespoon butter. Cook garlic 30 seconds, stirring.

Stir in broth and capers. Simmer on medium-low 3 to 5 minutes or until reduced by half. Stir in vinegar and lemon juice.

Finally, return chicken to skillet and spoon sauce over it. Cover and cook 8 to 10 minutes on medium or until chicken is cooked through. Sprinkle with parsley to serve.

Notes:

I’ve made this a few times now and it is quickly becoming a new favorite!

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 17.0

Happy Monday everyone! This week I am participating in the “It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?” meme.

***

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

Bookish posts from last week:

1) 2013: A Year in Reading

2) My 2014 Reading Challenges

My thoughts on books I recently finished:

jk-rowling-the-cuckoos-calling

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

After losing his leg to a land mine in Afghanistan, Cormoran Strike is barely scraping by as a private investigator. Strike is down to one client, and creditors are calling. He has also just broken up with his longtime girlfriend and is living in his office.

Then John Bristow walks through his door with an amazing story: His sister, the legendary supermodel Lula Landry, known to her friends as the Cuckoo, famously fell to her death a few months earlier. The police ruled it a suicide, but John refuses to believe that. The case plunges Strike into the world of multimillionaire beauties, rock-star boyfriends, and desperate designers, and it introduces him to every variety of pleasure, enticement, seduction, and delusion known to man.

You may think you know detectives, but you’ve never met one quite like Strike. You may think you know about the wealthy and famous, but you’ve never seen them under an investigation like this.

Confession: I didn’t find out about this book until after the news had already leaked that it was J.K. Rowling who had written it, and I also have not yet read The Casual Vacancy (although it is sitting on my shelf). I think the thought of reading another J.K. Rowling after Harry Potter was too intimidating–what if I didn’t like it (especially after the mixed reviews I’ve read of CV)? None of these thoughts were in my head though when I heard about The Cuckoo’s Calling since it sounded exactly like something I would love. However, now that I’ve read it, I can safety say that I liked this book but didn’t love it.

I think my biggest complaint about the book (and a quick perusal of Goodreads tells me I’m not alone here) is that the first half moves way, way too slow. Some books have a slow build-up to the action, but usually there is a good hook to keep you reading. Since this book is billed as a mystery/thriller I would have expected it to hook me more in the beginning then it did. Basically, the only thing that kept me reading for about the first hundred pages was that I knew J.K. Rowling had written this book and that if I waited long enough she probably wouldn’t let me down (luckily I was right).

Eventually I did get invested in the story, and the pace did pick up for about the second half of the book. I figured out the mystery pretty quickly, but still enjoyed reading through the end. The best part of the book in my opinion are the characters Cormoran Strike and his assistant, Robin, and I look forward to learning more about them in the sequel (set to be published this year???). In the end, I’m glad I had faith and stuck it out. 3/5 stars.

the smartest guys in the room

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

Remarkably, it was just a few years ago that Enron was thought to epitomize a great New Economy company, with its skyrocketing profits and share price. But that was before Fortune published an article by McLean that asked a seemingly innocent question: How exactly does Enron make money? From that point on, Enron’s house of cards began to crumble. Now, McLean and Elkind have investigated much deeper, to offer the definitive book about the Enron scandal and the fascinating people behind it.

Meticulously researched and character driven, Smartest Guys in the Room takes the reader deep into Enron’s past—and behind the closed doors of private meetings. Drawing on a wide range of unique sources, the book follows Enron’s rise from obscurity to the top of the business world to its disastrous demise. It reveals as never before major characters such as Ken Lay, Jeff Skilling, and Andy Fastow, as well as lesser known players like Cliff Baxter and Rebecca Mark. Smartest Guys in the Room is a story of greed, arrogance, and deceit—a microcosm of all that is wrong with American business today. Above all, it’s a fascinating human drama that will prove to be the authoritative account of the Enron scandal.

When the Enron scandal broke I was a freshman in high school, so although I remember hearing about it I didn’t really know much about it. Several years later, when I was a senior in college working in Houston for an internship, the Enron saga was brought to my attention again when a friend said “those are the old Enron towers” as we were driving through downtown Houston. I made a mental note to learn the details of what happened, and then promptly forgot until this book was called to my attention last year. And boy am I glad it was.

In the interest of full disclosure, I should say that this book is a bit long. It comes in at a whopping 480 pages and is pretty technical at parts (especially for us non-finance majors).  However, it is exhaustively researched, incredibly interesting, and very readable. McLean and Elkind do a great job of turning this very complex story into an understandable and frankly page turning narrative. In addition to the telling the technical side of the story, I think the authors also do a nice job of looking at the human aspect of it–the hubris, the ignorance, the greed. The corporate executives at the center of the scandal weren’t necessarily inherently bad people, and I think this book does a nice job of separating the facts from the gossip.

Overall, I thought this was a really great book and a must read for anybody with an interest in business (apparently it’s one of Warren Buffet’s favorite books). It was informative without being too dry, and is written at a level that even non-finance people (such as myself) can easily comprehend. If I could wish for anything different, it would be an updated edition. This book was published in 2004 (almost 10 years ago now) and I’d be curious to see the authors’ thoughts and comments ten years after the fact. 4.5/5 stars.

Books I recently read:

MissPeregrineCover

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

A horrific family tragedy sends Jacob 16 to a remote island off Wales, to the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, where he finds unusual old photographs. The children, one his grandfather, were more than peculiar, perhaps dangerous, quarantined for good reason – and maybe still alive.

robinson crusoe

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

Who has not dreamed of life on an exotic isle, far away from civilization? Here is the novel which has inspired countless imitations by lesser writers, none of which equal the power and originality of Defoe’s famous book. Robinson Crusoe, set ashore on an island after a terrible storm at sea, is forced to make do with only a knife, some tobacco, and a pipe. He learns how to build a canoe, make bread, and endure endless solitude. That is, until, twenty-four years later, when he confronts another human being.

Enemies

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

Enemies is the first definitive history of the FBI’s secret intelligence operations, from an author whose work on the Pentagon and the CIA won him the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award.

We think of the FBI as America’s police force. But secret intelligence is the Bureau’s first and foremost mission. Enemies is the story of how presidents have used the FBI as the most formidable intelligence force in American history.

Here is the hidden history of America’s hundred-year war on terror. The FBI has fought against terrorists, spies, anyone it deemed subversive—and sometimes American presidents. The FBI’s secret intelligence and surveillance techniques have created a tug-of-war between protecting national security and infringing upon civil liberties. It is a tension that strains the very fabric of a free republic.

This Week I am reading:

call of the wild

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

First published in 1903, The Call of the Wild is regarded as Jack London’s masterpiece. Based on London’s experiences as a gold prospector in the Canadian wilderness and his ideas about nature and the struggle for existence, The Call of the Wild is a tale about unbreakable spirit and the fight for survival in the frozen Alaskan Klondike.

This Week I am listening to:

sisterland

Synopsis adapted from Goodreads:

From an early age, Kate and her identical twin sister, Violet, knew that they were unlike everyone else. Kate and Vi were born with peculiar “senses”—innate psychic abilities concerning future events and other people’s secrets. Though Vi embraced her visions, Kate did her best to hide them.

Now, years later, their different paths have led them both back to their hometown of St. Louis. Vi has pursued an eccentric career as a psychic medium, while Kate, a devoted wife and mother, has settled down in the suburbs to raise her two young children. But when a minor earthquake hits in the middle of the night, the normal life Kate has always wished for begins to shift. After Vi goes on television to share a premonition that another, more devastating earthquake will soon hit the St. Louis area, Kate is mortified. Equally troubling, however, is her fear that Vi may be right. As the date of the predicted earthquake quickly approaches, Kate is forced to reconcile her fraught relationship with her sister and to face truths about herself she’s long tried to deny.

***

What are you reading this week?

It's Monday

Linking up with Book Journey!

Previous Older Entries